Character Agency: Creating Proactive Heroes

Another published sample of Wulf Moon’s Super Secrets in DreamForge magazine!

This Super Secret is on proactive vs. passive heroes. In many submissions from beginners, the protagonist is swept along by circumstance, passively reacting to events instead of exercising their will over events to change their circumstances. It’s a big problem among hopeful writers, often creating a weak internal character arc and failing to engage the reader! I can teach you how to fix that! Read this Super Secret for FREE HERE!

Chatting With Sherri Welcomes Back Wulf Moon!

My interview on the Chatting With Sherri program on BlogTalkRadio is now live and available to listen to on BlogTalkRadio! Just click the image above and enjoy!

We blended a cocktail from so many topics! Writers of the Future as the base, of course. Stirred in the wonderful results so many have enjoyed from applying my Super Secrets on writing. We also swirled in how the publishing deal on my upcoming books with Mark Leslie Lefebvre came about. Added a nice splash about Brittany Rainsdon and her recent successes with Deep Magic magazine and Writers of the Future Vol. 37. Poured in a shot on Elizabeth Chatsworth and the magic words spoken to encourage her to write her WotF winner. Of course we talked about Elizabeth’s success with her debut steampunk novel, THE BRASS QUEEN. And topped the cocktail off with my story “Shaken, Not Stirred” published in DreamForge Anvil magazine on Saturday, April 10th, 2021!

Finally, no fancy drink is complete without a garnish. Mine was going back in time to where I learned oral storytelling—from my childhood when I lived with my Chippewa grandmother. Topped it off with a pink umbrella by citing why magazines like DreamForge Anvil and Deep Magic are so important!

This cocktail is chilled to perfection!  Cheers!         Listen HERE.

Reject Rejectomancy!

Ken Liu cropped
Andy Dudak (left) interviews silkpunk author Ken Liu (right) at the 2018 Norwescon Conference in Seattle, Washington.

If you’re writing to be published, chances are you’ve suffered from some form of this mental condition. We’ve all gone through it, we’ve all caught it–some just show more virulent symptoms than others. We send out a story. It comes back with a rejection. It can be the dreaded form rejection, or it can be the encouraging personal rejection–also dreaded, because these can be even more confusing.

Then we drive ourselves nuts trying to guess why the story got rejected. This was to be the pinnacle of our writing career! The editor must have macular degeneration and have been three sheets to the wind! What other explanation is there? Oh. Maybe, just maybe, they left us an explanation, hidden secretly in their brief words. Ken Liu talked about this at Norwescon this year. He called the condition Rejectomancy. Let me get my notes. Hm. A place for everything and everything misplaced. Ah. Here it is under a tube filled with nautical maps of the San Juan Islands. Obviously! Okay, here we go! Continue reading “Reject Rejectomancy!”